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processing firms are leading the recovery. >>> and germany's latest exports seems to be recession proof. it's a tradition dating back to the middle ages, but germany's christmas markets are more popular than ever. nbc's andy eckh artson sends this report. >> every december, music rix out across girlny's favorite christmas market. berlin alone hosts more than 80 markets, each with its own character where the sights, sounds and smells of christmas combine to keep your financial crisis at bay. >> we don't feel a crisis. when you look around here at the christmas market, you meet so different people from germany and it's so popular to come to berlin. christmas season is present season. >> over the past 20 years, germany's christmas markets have become a big attraction and big business. analysts estimate that the german christmas market industry brings in billions of dollars annually. for many small businesses and traditional craftsmen, the markets are the main source of income for the year. makia, one of only ten mammoth ivory carvers in germany has seen his annual turnover grow since 2003. eve
with the british army against nazi germany. he took part in the allied invasion of normandy, a bloody battle that claimed thousands of lives. then he, you know, left ireland to go fight in the war because he just got married. he wanted to make a difference. he still had a wife and seven children. grandchildren as he got older. just what you would want to be as a man, i suppose. >> he wants justice for his grandfather, but time is running out. philip is over 90 years old. he never shows off his medals for bravery. even today, nearly 70 years later, he is afraid of the irish authorities. he deserted the irish army to fight for the british, and he was sent to prison when he returned. the trauma has remained with him. this is the first time his family has let anyone film him. strangers and even more so a video camera make him nervous. >> he is still nervous at this ste. i would want to see an apology, maybe, a thank you, a pardon for the paranoia he has gone through, the suffering wondering if a knock on the door means you get punished again and again. >> patrick started a petition to pardon the
elevate humans or elevate you denigrate human life. you have make everything relative. in germany right now there is a movement to legalize bestiality because they don't believe there is a difference between humanity and animals. 'canes gross! >> greg: once you equate animals to humanity you lose out in the industry. in food and land. >> kimberly: what were you reading? >> eric: where have you been? >> greg: i happen to be at a cafe with jasper that made me ill. >> dana: in la jolla, california, seal cove. they all go down there a you have to protect those. and there is all the different government agencies. nobody can get to clean the rocks. the bird poop. so some tourists don't want to have to smell it. >> kimberly: do you blame them? they have to clean it up. it's super smelly. birds in the area pooping. >> kimberly: but they don't go properly clean it. >> eric: they won't allow the businesses and private ownership to go and clean it on their own terms. >> greg: a question for bob. if lion's share of fracking were in blue states would federal government shut it down in >> bob: most
. >> they brought him gold, frankincense and myrrh. >> very good. the christmas degree originated in germany based on a prop in a mid evil play commemorating adam and eve then came over to england and eventually the united states. do you know what country the christmas tree tradition came from? >> norway. >> united states? >> isn't it from norway? >> netherlands? >> united states. >> germany? >> germany? >> germany? >> am i right? >> i don't know. i'm just guessing. >> i am german ancestry. >> that hurts that you didn't know that? >> it does. >> what's that big thing right over there. what do you call that. >> a christmas tree. >> i think it's called a christmas tree. can you call it whatever you like as long as the people are with their families there is nothing wrong with it? >> they are calling it a holiday tree in rhode island because they want to be politically correct. >> it's a christmas tree. >> it's a christmas tree. >> i love christmas. >> you know there is a war on christmas, right? >> i haven't heard. >> no. you haven't heard of the war on christmas? >> no. how can you have a war with
needs to be these bad decisions. we have alternatives. germany, the one large country that took serious this problem the germans announced they're going to soar past their target by 2020, and they think they'll be up by 65% all right this summer. voluntarilygermany, there were days that they used solar panels inside their own borders. they don't have florida texas new mexico to pad their statistics. they were showing that the engineering is there. >> germany raises a number of questions, and deutsche bank did a number of questions there was a greenpeace making the argument, it was deutsche bank saying there was a paradigm here. it begs this question. 2012 germany will reach their kyoto targets. the united states has pulled away. what other country has the envelope open this year will reach their course, and what was the economic lesson learned in terms of their success or failure as it relates to dramatically changing the way they produce-- >> look at germany and the scandinavian country which are the own people who have done like they're supposed to, their economies are doing pretty we
as the other cold war from pointe du hoc all the way through germany. when the even lead to patton's army at one point. let me just go from there. what's next is a story, part of the story i didn't really know about until i started researching it. these men, men accomplish their secondary objective which is to set up a roadblock that would cut the road that connected omaha beach in utah beach. it ran across the top of pointe du hoc. they set up in an l-shaped line for the next two days, the germans counterattacked relentless. and tired platoons were taken up by the germans to they broke through party line. only dog company held in his l-shaped line. the germans had reinforcements. this was a very, very close knit type thing. one of the men that was attacked of the second ranger battalion, a girl who was the number one commander had fought in north africa, and one of the most poignant things he had was, i had never come so close being either killed or captured that my. he was convinced that that was what was going to happen. the germans will relentlessly counter attacking. from pointe du h
, as opposed to adam lan za and what triggers this. think of germany, germany in the last three year has had three mass shootings, and they've had the strictest gun control laws in the world. including psychological profiling. and 2011, czech republic, nearby germany, has very lax gun control, they have not had this type shooting. >> so there's nothing we can do? we need to be complacent in the fact that we can send our children to school to be assassinated? >> no, i think that one of the problems we have on the gun control debate is it immediately starts dividing people into, you disagree with me, therefore, you're the enemy. i've opened up saying let's put gun issues on the table. let's include mental health. video games, home back ground in there. and i think where there is common ground, you could say the storage of weapons. but when we immediately start saying, well, you want this, therefore you dislike children or whatever, it's not productive to the debate. and i want to point out, i've been in congress for a long time, i can tell you, gun control debates are very, very difficult. and
. in germany it's created 400,000 new jobs. it's created $4 billion in cash flow through the economy and making the german economy the strongest in europe and it's the -- it basically is a policy that pays the homeowners so it makes investing in solar attractive to homeowners. right now it's not attractive to put a hundred solar panels on your roof, but under this policy germany has made tremendous advances. there is one country in the world that is 100% solar power as of last month. cca cannot possibly do what they need done. the word -- you can boil this whole argument down to one question, one word and that is "inevitability". we are running out of the oil. we are drowning in our own waste. we need to stop burning oil and the way you could do it is putting a couple hundred solar panels on each house in san francisco. this was indirectly mentioned in the guardian editorial but they don't say it and it's because they don't understand it. it's important to understand what being done in germany and other countries around the world because by doing this they're creating a massi
assume you were talking about soviet russia and nazi germany. were these regimes possible because of the uniformity? if that is the case, how did the myriad number of protestant denominations in the united states provide a unique defense against tyranny? >> i would not say -- i was not referring to just the soviet union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are r
. but basically issue selection. within germany the companies have done well, in general it has been an issue selection. ashley: you think of areas being well, europe is not one of them. he mentioned germany, even germany is being dragged down to what is going on in the region as a whole. how do you pick the stocks? you like the multinationals, don't you? >> one thing that we have invested in his multinationals. companies around the world, spain, peril around the world. cars around the world. multinational companies that are doing stuff right in this environment. we think that is the formula, broad-based market and the people that are executing within that. ashley: aren't you concerned about continued volatility in that area? italian elections coming up in february, german elections not far behind that, has to be seen whether angela merkel can survive that. does that give you cause for concern? >> there is no question about that. every election that has happened in the last two or three years, the incumbent has been evicted from office. you can worry about angela merkel, our guess is she is d
was not supposed to live. >> they called me from germany and they said your son is very critical. i don't think so that he make it to america. and then i -- i told them he is coming. >> i promise if you keep him alive for me i will take care of him, i said to god. >> after 81 days in a coma, joel woke up at brook army medical center in it texas. >> i didn't know where i was at. i could have woke up in timbuktu and i didn't know what was going on. it was like really. >> he lost a leg, his eyes, fingers on one hand. suffered a traumatic brain injury and burned on more than 60% of his body. his parents put their lives on hold to be with their son as he learned to walk and speak again and endured dozens and dozens of surgeries and with their support he began his unbelievable recovery. >> joel went from not even walking to walking, talking, running around, dancing and everything. >> then about two years ago joe met andy who had been through a life changing experience of his own when ran to the world trade center on 9/11 to help with the search and rescue. >> i lost three friends than day and i made a p
is fascinating bearing in mind where we are in terms of the macro story and germany might well be floating -- >> certainly a big departure in the sense that the german stock market has typically traded in line with the german economy and this is a big divergence. so that's a change. but looking over time, all stocks have the component of what they call the economic return. speculative return which is it for change and the valuation that the market puts on it. over time, one is a possum gain and the other is zero sum gain. sometimes good news, sometimes bad news. but over time the kind of net being nothing. >> we'll see what happens. good to have you on. we'll be out in westminster, joined by the british shadow business secretarier to. we'll talk currencies. find out why one strategist is bullish on the currency. after the ramp up in m&a that we've seen this year, we'll also speak to an expert in los angeles that says the fundamentalses for deal activity in 2013 are looking more solid. so where will the money flow in the new year, that's at 11:20. and the outlook for u.s. credit market appe
to get the latest results from germany's survey any second now. in the meantime, i can can bring you news. for example, on industrial orders and sales in italy, orders flat on the month, down .2 on the month for sales and down nearly 5% on the year. so confirming some of the weakness that we know we've seen previously in the italian economy. meanwhile, another gauge perhaps for the euro as we look to the strength of it lately. that's the current counselor plus which in october was an adjusted 3.9 billion euros, up quite a bit from the 2.5 billion reported for september. now that also comes after -- a day after the european union's report suggesting that in fact the european union would have to run a surplus, given its poor demographics over the next couple of years. now let's get a quick preview of the news. for that we head to patricia, awaiting the results. what do we expect to see? >> reporter: we're expecting the second consecutive month to the upside for the business sentiment next year in germany. november was a surprise after six months to the downside. we expect december to book i
are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great expression in the 1930 -- you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1
. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in britain, the chancellor george osbourne delivers his statement to parliament today. will be out in westminster soon. steve is out to give us more detailed analysis of what to expect. let's just go back to the eurozone. as you say, thin advances here. are we capping -- it's up against the yen as well. there's obviously been a big yen story. >> yeah, i think the euro/yen has had perhaps more to do with eu euro/dollar than anything else. the euro crosses in general have been story rather than euro/dollar and euro/yen at the forefront. i think the euro/yen forecast is overplayed in what japan will ultimately deliver on. but mum is pretty good. i think you still play for a little yen weakness. i think we'll see a lot of people trying to buy yen back because i don't think we'll get delivery in all these preelection promises. >> do we all think we know what the chancellor is going to say? >> judging by the many pages being given to it in the n
won't do particularly well, but germany and italy maybe next year have a potential surprise on the upside. >> how much of a surprise? >> it will not be a fast recovery. the ecb will be forced to do more, but they'll be drald dragged into it. so things will have to get worse before they act. so i don't really think -- >> what more actions? they have a t program waiting to go. what more actions are you talking about? >> the key policy rate for the ecb is likely indeed in the first quarter. they can take dpopt deposit rate negative. by the middle of next year, they'll be doing outright qe. i've been talking about this for ages. they haven't done it so maybe they won't do it. but i'm assuming that the outlook for inflation for the eurozone is -- >> how are they going to get around -- look, i know the bundes bank has a fear of hyper inflation. i just don't -- are they going to get around all the -- because even if they do it on the inflation mandate, are they going to get around the objections about outright money printing? germans would see it as that. >> they would see it as ou
is that the youeuropeans are only able to do that because in fact the us army lives in germany and actually picks up their defense tab. you can't do it -- there's nobody to bail out america the way germany's bailing out europe. >> john boehner was on the program the other night. he said hey, i wasn't consulted about this latest offer. i wish i was. this talk about republican conservatives, tea party members that were purged from certain committees because they had a criteria list if they didn't meet or match the leadership vote schedule. is that a message to the more conservative way of the republican party? >> i think so. he's absolutely right to be disturbed about it. it's not john boehner's job to make this math add up. it's not john boehner's job to find ways of funding a three and a half or four trillion dollar budget. it's insane. if the democrats want to have a three and a half, four trillion dollar federal budget, fine. they can be the party of that. there ought to be a party that represents an alternative and john boehner is saying no, we'll help you close that gap. who needs the republican
twice as much as canada and germany. more than twice as much as britain and japan. rationing is supposed to be the lower cost, the american way of rationing costs more. what do we get for all that money? 41 countries have higher average life expectancy. 40 countries have a lower infant mortality rate than we do. we have one of the poorest records of actually curing people of curable diseases in the western world. of our spending still leaves millions without health coverage. does the affordable care act continue or does it disrupted the american way of rationing? i could say it does a little bit of both, but at 2500 pages that actually does a lot of both. first of all, by requiring insurance companies to accept people with preexisting conditions obamacare strikes a major blow against rationing by health condition. i don't think it is possible to overstate the significance of this because it is telling insurance companies they have to fundamentally change the way they do business. their job is to cover sick people as well as healthy ones and that is a very big change for the american insu
and the support groups and we proceeded to attack across into germany. >> there's much more to the story. next, the images he will never be able to forget. >>> 71 years ago following the bombing of pearl harbor, the u.s. entered world war ii. they then moveded into germany and witnessed firsthand horrors of the haolocaust. you're about to see stark images of the war, sights that waitzman say still live with him to this very day. >> our first contact is what we call the holocaust. there was a city of dinslaken. we were greeted with thousands of dead bodies. it was conveyed to us later that the germans poured gasoline on people and burn them alive. we went to nordhausen. we went to this camp. after neutralizing their fire and lowering down the gates, we were again greeted by thousands of dead bodies. we came to a crematorium area. there were 10 or 12 ovens in that camp. most of them the doors were very hot. we got them open, found bones and ashes. we had no idea what to do for these poor people. we gave them sips of water and to not try to do anything else. the medical detachment got there short
't leave germany until 2:00 p.m. and doesn't get back until the 10:00 p.m. hour. meanwhile -- nobody's said this on television, nobody's mentioned this -- they thought they were going to be attacked in tripoli, the embassy was evacuated in tripoli. yet whether they have the injured people on the tarmac, they are severely injured, they send an airplane over to benghazi and they returned to tripoli -- instead of going to italy or to germany -- then the c-17 has to come -- it makes no sense. it makes absolutely no sense. >> greta: the irony and i have no sympathy for the administration's claiming this is politicized because if they would just simply answer these questions, not drag their feet, maybe we will get it in the next 6 or 7 days, but if they would fill in the blanks, nobody would be suspicious. we get silly answers that don't make sense -- that's the problem. that is created by those who hold the facts. >> that's right! i am not trying to politicize this. we have injured americans! in the worst case ttakes 25 hours to extract them to a facility, an american facility, they're in german
shootings in world history. in fact, they both occurred over the last decade was in germany. germany has extremely strict begun control laws. people talk about bans on semiautomatic weapons. you have to undergo two psychological screening tests. both the examples given -- >> i understand. i think everything should be on the table. i don't have a gun, i don't have a bushmaster, i don't know why someone needs 30 rounds necessarily in a magazine, if you're gougt and hunting deer. you make the point these are hunting guns made to look like military guns but they don't have the features of military guns, is that your point? >> that's right. they ban guns based upon how they look, rather than how they function. semiautomatics, one pull of the trig, one bullet comes out. semiautomatics do lots of harm. but the problem is we have to realize that has both costs and benefits. we see the costs here but the benefits are let's say you were attacked by two criminals. would you want to have a gun where you had to manually load the bullets in? if you had a rifle had the pull the bolt back, you may not h
and insulatedding old buildings and creating renewable energy economy like they have done in germany. they have 50% renewables. all of germany is 25-30% renewables. that's mostly solar. germany has less sun than much of america. the idea that is not an economic solution is a complete falsity. we're totally at the point we can do this right now. i think the, you know, we're really in a situation where there's an old paradigm, the oh oh post oil revolution, industry which is very powerful and strong, perhaps the strongest in the world. they obviously want to continue to do things within their paradigm and with their own interests in mind. that's how the free market works, i guess but we have to enlighten the people and make them understand there is nothing safe about this. it's just as dirty as coal, it's going to cause climate change. it's not which fossil fuel we like. this is all about climate change and obviously having clean air and water is important but if we tip the earth into unlivable environment, everybody suffers. in fact, a lot of us are going to perish. so, you know, it seems overly dr
to the rest of the world, if you look at germany, uk, japan, france, all of whom have very strong gun regulations, we have more gun deaths in one week than they have in an entire year, and the incidents -- the number of times in which guns inside a home are used for self-defense are exceedingly small, on the order of maybe 1 in 15, 1 in 20 as compared to the number of times when a gun is used either for suicide or a homicide. anybody that looks at the data here is quite clear that on the whole, particularly things like assault weapons, create far, far more kor nage in th carnage in this country than they prevent. to a large extent the reason why i think progressives have not been able to mount an effective campaign for sensible gun laws, it's been a failure of the progressive movement, and i think that will now change with progressives. they must realize they have to make this an election issue. all of the polls show that the public is widely in favor of sensible gun regulations. i will point out what i said on friday. president clinton after columbine when we were meeting in the oval
was german. >> what's your address in germany? >> hamburg, germany. >> even though they were from germany, could they have had some connection with theal gainian men quinn mentioned in her first call to reid? >> we saw the blue bag. one of the guys was joking and said i'm sure there's money inside. that's a lot of money. what are we going to do with it? >> but in an unbelievable stroke of bad luck it turned out these men were not the kidnappers. >> and it becomes pretty clear pretty quick that these guys were in the wrong place at the wrong time. >> the men were actually college exchange students. two of them played on the same tennis team. >> they looked at a bag and said, hey, wouldn't it be cool if there was some money in that bag and it was that simple, that coincidental and couldn't make it up. >> the college students stumbled on to the bag, picked it up and got scared when they saw cars following them. they then called 911. >> we found a blue bag in a parking lot and there was a lot of money in there and we just want to give it to you guys. >> they came down to jacksonville beach to
. he is in germany in terms of potential. steven leblanc talking texas in the next fox business exclusive you cannot afford to miss, what is he buying now? should you follow? i always wait until the lt minute. can i still ship gift in me r christmas? yeah, se you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male annouer ] break om the holiday stress. ship fedex expreress by decber 22nd for christmas delivery. now we need a little bit more... [ malennouncer ] at humana, we understand the value of quality time and personal attention. which is why we are proud to partner with halth care profesonals who understand the difference that quality time with our members can make... that's a very nice cake! ohh! [ giggles ] [ male announcer ] humana thanks the physicians, nurses, hospitals, pharacists and other health professionals who helped us achieve the highest average star rating among national medicare companies... and become the first and only national medicare advantage company to achieve a 5-star rating for a medicare plan... your efforts result in the quality of care and service w
, germany, the u.s., of course, even the soviet union. >> -- tavis: that is my point. everybody seems to be guilty of that over the course of history. i am glad you took a question. what does africa have today that the rest of the world does not prove >> -- does not? >> some possibilities. some structures of spirituality, and i emphasize that, spirituality which is not aggressive. decimating a culture, which christianity is guilty of. islam is guilty of. a tolerant spirituality. in the new world, in brazil, where african religions co have it and become -- where they cohabit. this is a lesson for some of the so-called world religions. they have taken joy in decimating humanity tavis: -- and decimating humanity. tavis: i raise this question. just like china, the world power now advancing in africa, the catholic church has found africa is a place that is very fertile. what say you about the catholic church all of that continent? they are getting new converts daily, hourly. >> a bit more selectivity or control. who is going to argue about the ultimate fundamental? you have a contest for t
be integrated into how a nation gets its power. more on that after this break. >>> in germany right now there's been a real revolutionary transformation of the grid there. i have some video looking at what the kind of new german energy future or present looks like. you have times when half the power in germany is being produced by renewables. you have a tremendous explosion of wind and solar generation. how did this happen, dave? how did germany begin to undertake this? >> it's a fascinating story. the german law doesn't cost -- this is what it says. it doesn't cost the government any money. electric rate payers pay an extra fee to subsidize people who install solar or wind. people who install solar and wind are guaranteed a higher than market rate of return for something like a decade. these are called feed-in tariffs to keep with green's, you know, aptitude for great terminology. >> screw it. tomorrow we're doing an how on that. >> yes. i had dinner with the parliamentian in germany that got this passed last year. i asked him, this one law is like a lever transforming one of the biggest ind
in germany or alabama. want them in lexington, kentucky or china? >> you mentioned germany. volkswagen opened a plant in chattanooga a few months ago, 2,000 new jobs. bob corcoran was down there. 2,000 jobs, every one of which started at $14.50 an hour. >> right. they're not all going to be at -- >> so volkswagen was moving these jobs here because we're the low wage country compared to germany. >> dude, are you suggesting we push these jobs away? >> i'm not. >> i would rather americans have a shot at a $17 an hour job than having it in china. >> i agree. >> find a way to do better. i actually agree with you. but you have to understand the consequences are pretty severe for american lifestyles. >> again, though, i'm sorry, mike, but the consequences are, we have two choices, we can't get 1965 wages, we either have these jobs in china or lexington, either have them in alabama or germany and this is at least for some of -- a chance for younger americans to get some good jobs. >> joe, if you're taking a job that pays $14.50 an hour. it means one of two things, a, you don't have a job so you're ge
, 1.63. and bond yields higher. they got kicked higher in germany post that survey which we broke on the show, as well. as far as the currency market, dollar bit under pressure ahead of the fed. euro/dollar 130.08. we were down late friday and early monday trade, as well. dollar/yen, highs polls suggest mr. erbe will be a clear win in japan. however big will the lead be and what influence tell have on the bank of japan. dollar and yen pressured by more q.e. talk. and aussillar three-month high. the prospect of q.e. boosting commodityets. canadian doing well. firm at 1.6122. we have more on the asian trading day out of singapore. >> reporter: hi, thank you, ross. most asian markets finished on a bright note. the shanghai composite recouped morning losses in positive territory. property stocks turned higher in the afternoon. stocks also rallied while investors await beijing's detailed plan on urban development. strengthening main line blue chips pushed the hang seng to a 16-month high. developers, industrials, and gaming stocks among the top gamers today. >>> in japan the country's
to this, ambassador burt was the u.s. ambassador to the federal republic of germany from 85-89, and before that worked in the state department as assistant secretary of state for european and canadian affairs and 83-85. and before that was the direct of political military affairs in the department of state. so he, along with his colleagues, has a long and eminent involvement of these issues but and finally last but not least, ambassador matlock, known to many of us, career ambassador, he's been holding a series of academic posts. i'm not going to list them all, since 1981, 91, excuse me. but during his 35 years in the american foreign service, 1956-91, he served as ambassador to the soviet union from 1987-1991, a special assistant to the president for national security affairs, and senior director for european and soviet affairs on the national security staff from 83-86. and as ambassador to czechoslovakia from 81-83. i will not go over the rest of his eminent and long career in the interest of time, but i just did want to give you a brief recap of all three of them. and, of course, marvin
during the november 2012 fighting. iraq's president has arrived in germany for further treatment after having a stroke them that he was taken to hospital monday night but doctors have reported the stabilized him. he has had a series of health problems in recent years. a shake-up at the u.s. state department. who is out of a job following the findings of a security investigation. women using technology to build their business. the those headlines in just a moment. >> it is a very unsettled picture across europe. we have this area of low pressure. this frontal system giving some torrential rainfall. and improvement here but on the forward edge of this frontal system there is likely to be some snow extending down toward the alpine region. some shower weather for the u.k. and much of france, too. over eastern parts of europe seeing cloudy skies, outbreaks of rain. -14 degrees is expected in moscow. we have a fairly brisk, northwesterly wind making an impact all the way down towards sudan seeing temperatures below average at 29 degrees. as we move into central parts of africa, while the mon
that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, how he sees it is he said, look, the big drivers are probably these economic forces, but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces has exacerbated them. so even as you have these economic forces creating much, much more concentration at the very top, you expect politics to sort of try to so much that blow. social institutions to soften that
germany but there is in english strain as well. the queen mother was from an english slavish scottish family. it is a mix. there is a significant german lineage. it was a problem right before world war i when the family name was very germanic and her grandfather king george five change the names of all people so they were less germanic and other names were
was released from hospital early this week. >> a very special honor for a who survive germany's concentrating camps. white lighting the menorah is just the beginning of the celebration. put the scarves a 99-year-old holocaust menorah int a ohio. s, says it's a miracle he survived the holocaust to make it this far. will celebrate turning 100 . ter this week the national menorah was lit time ago. t was the first of hanukkah will be the second night. guests were treated to u.s. navyes by the band and the three tenors. and a beautiful night. different this year. it looks really bright. about the weather. folks are saying where is winter? going to finally have colder air? >> it is the second night of hanukkah and we are looking at a bit of fog outside. visibility at reagan national down to 3 miles. this is looking right down and you can avenue hardly see the capitol building in the center of your screen. look for reduced visibility. wind chill not a problem with f the northeast at 3 miles an hour. the wind will ease as you move through the night and that's why looking at the fog. 52 degrees was i
in the row is president obama. heads of state occupy six of the top 10 spots with germany's chancellor angela merkel and vladimir putin drinking at two and 3. also making the list, bill gates. and pope benedict -- who is now on twitter. and by the way, mr. facebook is not on the list. >> really? >> he dropped off. >> i wonder if steve jobs would have made it? >> there is a lot of power there. the power of letting us know what is going to happen the next couple of days. >> up, down. up down. is a bumpy seven-day forecast in terms of temperatures. i think that is the best way to put it. you mentioned it is good weather for hockey. i want to take you to the rooftop camera. i zoomed in across the river. people are enjoying probably of their lunch breaks. it is actually good weather if you get outside and skates. the last few days, the ice was rather soft. but today, only 41. cooler air -- we do notd. it is very calm at this time. it is light and variable. then it ships southerly. 39 in martinsburg and papers were -- gaithersburg. chilly all across the board. compare that to this time yesterday? l
industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand t connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and conder carefully before investing.
germany to somehow get revenge against hitler. they were looking after their only tribal interests, they were not patriotic, and in a funny way he accused the jews of everything that billy graham's and protestants accused his son of when he ran for the presidency in 1960. he didn't believe it was possible to be a jew and to be a true patriot at the same time and those who opposed his son's election because he was roman catholic he said you couldn't be a catholic and a true blooded american at the same time because they couldn't turn him down. is it true kennedy's views about the future of the stock market was influenced by his bootblack one day was giving him advice on the marquette and supposedly kennedy had said on his way to his office he thought something is wrong when they give me advice? >> it's a great story. i found no evidence. it may be true. there are some stories they found no evidence for. i didn't include it in my book because i couldn't verify it. but kennedy didn't need it to tell him that. kennedy was really smart. and when you look back at the crash of 1929, as wh
, including canada, germany, great britain, japan, france-- why are their gun deaths so much lower than ourselves? i mean, john howard, a very conservative prime minister-- former prime minister of australia said we don't want the american disease in australia. why is it that all these other countries don't seem to have this problem? >> well, they have soo they have a homicide problem. they have a violent crime problem. in britain, it's four times what ours is. they don't have as many guns. that doesn't prevent killing. it doesn't prevent mayhem. it doesn't prevent violent crime. >> schieffer: you don't really believe people armed with baseball pats batcan somehow kill more people than people armed with guns. >> in this country, more people are beaten to death than are killed by long guns. >> schieffer: the people who are surviving gunshot wounds now, it's because we have better medical help, david, for the same reason-- >> that's good. >> schieffer: yes, it's good. it's the same reason more of our people are surviving on the battlefields, but that's not the end of it. why do you-- why
my wife and daughter in germany. i miss you, love you and will see you soon.it comes we understand. milies fa, at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking
because most people in this town, and the media do not know that germany is approaching 100% renewable energy and there is already a nation that is 100% solar and the cca plan is just failure. designed to fail, so if you're not aware of that, if you never heard that before you should talk to somebody who knows and there's people who have written books on this how this policy must fail. it's just scientifically designed upside down and backwards. it can't possibly succeed but san francisco needs because we're a leadership town we need a policy that will win. the mayor talked to the mayor of freeberg germany who has a policy and we think we should talk to them over there. thank you. >> thank you. is there any other member of the public that would like to speak? seeing none public comment is closed. colleagues i think i have a sense how we should proceed and we will move forward and introduce a resolution expanding the ability of staff to focus on other issues besides cca and we will work with our staff to figure out the most ix pidishes way to bring the position in house, and one o
we had in 2008, 2009. very different from the early 1980s. second, germany, including the rest of the european union seems to be going into a recession and germany entering it means 2013, first half, is going to be very difficult. chinese growth slowed significantly. i can't see where the u.s. growth will come from. exports will suffer. >> jim, we are seeing a lot of activity at the end of the year as investors and companies try to beat those higher tax rates. for example, some companies issuing special dividends because they assume tax rates will go up next year, which will they will, but you don't think it is good for toward the special dividends we are seeing. >> i'm okay if it is a dividend-paying company, like utility companies or high-yield staple stock or something. if they're going to pay a special head -- because that's why shareholders buy their company. i'm not okay with it in areas where i make an investment for companies for growth and they come up and pay me a special dividend this year. it makes me weary. if the best i can get is they will pay their cash to pay a
. the imf estimateds that the u.k. next year will grow more strongly than france or germany, and our credible fiscal policy allows for supported monetary policy. and with the bank of england, we are directly addressing the problems of tight credit through the 70 billion pound funding for lending scheme. in the opr's view today, this has lowered interest rates in the real economy and will add to the level of real gdp. one area where the british economy has done much better than forecast is in creating jobs. since early 2010 the private sector has created 1.3 -- 1.2 million new jobs, 600,000 more than was predicted, and youth unemployment has been falling. instead of peaking at 8.7%, the ob russian expects the peak at 8.3%. this at a time when the unemployment rate in spain is 26%, in france it is almost 11%, and across the whole eurozone it is almost 12%. employment, already at a record high, is set to go on rising each year of the forecast, and for every one job less in the public sector, two new jobs are expected to be created in the private sector. britain now has a greater proport
this crisis very well. germany, for example, is doing much better than the united states. the employment has shrunk to the last few years. basically cause the entire crisis. we began at about 5%. we went up to 10% in vietnam at eight and a half%. does not a recovery at all. the germans a doing well. they have one of the best safety nets in europe. there provision of services for other people has not been icons of their having a hard time. the other parts of europe that are doing quite nicely as scandinavia. famous for the quality and quantity of their safety. the idea that european problems because they have the sickened at requires you not to know much . the store. having said that, the crisis is very real in your, and i would urge all of you to pay attention because europe is a very, very important player in the world. in many ways the number one player. but if you take that european market together more people and more product. that is a very important part of the world economy, as important as the american states. also the place in the world that has had more violent warfare among dismem
catholicism and culminating in the horrors of nazism which implicated not only germany but many other nations as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketplaces to shops, although the law does not mention the word women, muslim, bertha or bail it was introduced by president nicolas sarkozy and a ban on muslim veiling which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law makes illegal the barca but france is the first country to enact a full ban on the burke that in public space similar restrictions of being considered all over e
cheaper? europe. >> germany and france at two-week highs last week. >> there's a few countries over there. i like the relative value there. they've got a printing press. they're going to open that. what i learned is you don't fight the tape and don't fight a bailout. i've got about 30% off this country -- outside of this country. and added 10% in emerging markets. now i think that we've had a bloodless revolution again in china, i think it's a great place. look at emerging markets. better value while you wait around. >> and they've done well over the last year. it was just they've been the silent gain. you haven't quite realized they've been doing so well. >> i like it. i wouldn't rush into anything. if you hid cash on the side, what a good time getting in. >> this market has stopped reacting on a minute by minute basis to all the prognostications out of washington on the fiscal cliff. what do you make of that? are we becoming complacent? are we immune? what are you talking about on the floor? >> we just had the president speak. nothing there. china numbers tomorrow. then germany. maybe n
miles inside time in his east germany but was still a free city protected by the western powers. in november 1958, khrushchev delivered an ultimatum. the west had to be out of berlin and six months, or else. this is a crisis, the greatest crisis of the cold war up to that point. the press, congress and much of the eisenhower administration this men were. we need to show resolve, it was said, to beef up our troop strength and get ready to divide the red army. meeting privately with his advisers and congressional leaders, president eisenhower said we aren't going to do that. indeed he said we're cutting our forces in germany by 50,000. is advisors and accounting were bewildered. cut our troop strength? won't that show went to this -- won't that show weakness? i was all alone. he was heavily criticized in the press. but he is seen utterly unfazed. i've now had a great capacity to take responsibility. the amazing that famous photograph taken of ike on the eve of d-day, june 1944, general eisenhower as a supreme allied commander wearing his uniform and talking to a group of paratroop
and the flash point was berlin, the former german capital, 100 miles inside east communism germany, but still a free city protected by the western powers. in 1958, there was an ultimatum. the west had to be out of berlin in six months or else. this was a crisis, the gravest crisis of the cold war up to that point. the prez -- the press, congress, and the administration thought if meant war. we needed resolve to beef up the troops' strength and defy the red army. meeting privately with the leaders, president eisenhower said we're not going to do that. indeed, he said, we're cutting forces in germany by 50,000 men. his advisers and the congressmen bewildered. cut the troop strength? won't that show weakness? ike was all alone and heavily criticized in the press. he seemed utterly unphased. eisenhower had a great capacity to take responsibility. he may have seen that famous photograph taken of ike on the eve of d-day in june 1944. general eisenhower, the supreme allied commander, wearing normal uniform, talking to a group of paratroopers, geared up, faces blackened, ready to jump mind german lin
the soviet troupes out of eastern europe. going to let nato take over germany. unite germany and nato can have their germany as long as nato doesn't go further. these kinds of things are in the air. what does bush do? tianimen square happens, he suspended relations, but behind the scenes does business as usual with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in,
and finance merging, finance taking over industry, which was what pretty well happened in germany. this was never the case. the united states had a very, very broad financial ostentation . the decentered financial system and one in which financial markets therefore broaden the but not linked directly to particular industries. in their function became that of developing financial instruments which will allow finance to go into the market as individual firms and issue commercial paper to raise their money rather than getting it to wrigley from lynx to particular financiers. that led eventually to the world emulating the rest of the markets. the german banks which were so closely integrated into their industry. deutsche bank is not in distinguishable from goldman. and it explicitly said is a began to shift toward becoming an investment bank along the lines of wall street's, we would be engaging conflict of interest if we are writing ipos for firms that now we are deeply integrated with. they end up owning almost all the mortgages in black cleveland at the time of the 2000 crash. deut
. in austria and germany, the unemployment rate is about 5%. it has been 164 days since julian assange seeked silence in ecuador. he is wanted for questioning in sweden over allegations of sexual assault, but the price tag has cost the taxpayer over $3 million. >> he is the man that shot to fame for selling state secrets when he website released confidential american cables. in 2010, to swedish women accused him of sex crimes. faced with extradition, he fled to the embassy saying the swedish authorities did not guaranteed not to send them to the u.s.. to promote a new book he has written, he speaks out. >> the swedish government refuses to behave in a way that is at all normal, rational, were reasonable. that is why i have been granted political asylum. >> they say he must face questioning. they are outside the embassy 24 hours a day, waiting to arrest him the moment he walked out. it has cost 21 million pounds and counting. he is reported to be eating a lot of take away food, running on a treadmill and using a special lamp to get vitamin d. he appeared in robust health despite suggestions th
the summer polishing spainer and paella. he spoke italian and air back and encouraged me to study germany, learn italian to communicate in tu knee sha and learn spanish to speak with my patients. i saw the world through his eyes. i remember walking into a restaurant in cairo and the waiter saying something in arabic to chris. he chuckled and translated. when you walk in, the whole room lights up. was that just chris or beauty of the arab language or how perfectly they understood each other? chris incorporated the wonderful values of our parents and shared these with the world. he's always been with me. he was the first to see my stand in the crib. he probably taught me to walk. he set the standards for our family really high and brought wonderful friends into our lives, friends who are like brothers and sisters to us now. chris was my most important mentor. he showed me how. so it is not important who your mother is only, not just important who your father is but very important who your big brother is. we had the best. the world needs a lot more big brothers like chris stevens. >> i am to
triangles on their clothes and in germany 4 million out of 85 million germans were members of nudist organizations and clubs. in 1933 after the nazis seized was a decree issued ordering all gas stopo forces to destroy the nude culture and they did. in san francisco we have a nudist movement. at best you could say we are regular people promoting body acceptance and we are a harmless group of eccentrics. a small mawpive group is controlling supervisor wiener. mr. wiener has made this bargain. if there has to be a nudity ordinance let the people of san francisco decide if they lose the freedoms in a open initiative process and whether they're for tolerance and body freedom or else kill this legislation now. this is san francisco. people all around the world consider us a beacon for acceptance and tolerance and center for free thought. this is america, land of the free. this kind of legislation can't happen here, can it? thank you. >> next speaker. >> hi i am she'lly tenny. i am a lifetime resident of the castro and i intend to raise my kids here and it's about the neighborho
the legislation, so i will try not to be too hiker bollic but equate this with nazi germany and scott wiener is a little bit over board. thank you. >> next speaker. >> good morning. good morning ladies and gentlemen. my name is mitch hightower and live in the community and i am -- part of the naked nude and two words that make everyone's ears perk up even here in san francisco. the supervisor has seriously exaggerated the nudity in jane warner plaza and now a city wide problem and involving every elected official in local government. this has given the supervisor media attention and has name is known around the planet and throwing away san francisco live and let live and i ask you where is the evidence? i will tell you what evidence i have. i have a petition with 1500 signatures and comments and asking you ladies and gentlemen, the board of supervisors, not -- i politely repeat not to implement a city wide nudity ban. the supervisor from district eight refers to some of his own constituents as disgusting and a blight on the neighborhood. this has rendered intolerable in san francisco
against the members of the board, the police department, comparisons to nazi germany to me are out of bounds. i think what is missing in this debate is the dedication to civility. i am fully in support of this measure. it has become a vocal debate in my home and office and within the castro and to quote donna summer and barbara striez sand qualify enough is enough". it's an issue of civility. being naked and exposing oneself in public maybe a joy to some, but those that work and tended those with hiv and worked with the lgbt homeless youth and making it not an adult neighborhood but a neighborhood. we find it offensive. i find it offensive. i urgelet full board to pass this ban and i am sure no one is happy to see this come before the board. thank you. >> thank you. next speaker. >> i am thomas lynch. i am from berkeley. i am fearful of the precedent you will set if you allow this to continue. wearing clothes in public is certainly a healthy pres defnlt i hear now that genital decoration is the new thing and a clue to standards being yielded. if i were a parent i would b
.s., the netherlands, and germany providing the weapons but the alliance stressed the move was defensive. >> the deployment of patriot missiles will serve as an effective deterrent and that way, diaz with the situation along the syrian-turkish border. >> russia is the one fly in the right man. the foreign minister said he would not block the move. a sign an old ally may be losing patience with president assaad. they hope deploying missiles will help stabilize tensions but the bigger concern is what is happening inside syria itself. specifically, what the regime might do with its stockpile of chemical weapons. syria has used much of its considerable arsenal to crush the rebellion. hidden from view it is believed to have developed a chemical weapons program and there are reports of activity, prompting this uncompromising western message. >> we are concerned for the same reason the united states has. we have sent our own clear, private message directly to them about the serious consequences that would follow from the use of such weapons. >> those consequences are not been spelled out and sy
and france called for an enter introduction of a unified oversight while germany urged a gradual implementation. ministers also couldn't agree on how much supervisory authority to give the european central bank. they decided to meet again next week for further discussions. eu, economic, and monthly tear affairs commissioner said consolidation of oversight will be the first step towards a banking union. it will include a framework for bailing out nations with excess debts. he said failure is not an option. last month eu leaders agreed to allow the region central bank to supervise some 6,000 commercial banks in the eurozone. the goal is so set up a framework by the end of the year and launch the new system next year. now let's get a check on markets. tokyo share prices are trading in a narrow range. the nikkei is down 1/4 of a percent at 9,409, a loss of 24 points from tuesday's close. they're sidelining after taking profits if recent gainers at the open. they're refraining from major moves to confirm the next steps in the u.s. budget talks. the obama administration and opposition
cristobal. marching with them, visitors from the united states, germany, and china. some of them grew up in that culture. >> we were walking in the parade this morning, and there was a sea of bocamchi faces, young and old. all of a sudden i felt tears coming out of my eyes. it was amazing. >> reporter: linguists borris and beth are a big reason for this celebration. >> we're linguists, but we're wordless at this point. >> reporter: it is god's word that is the cause of the celebration. the new testament is now available in their language. and it is the linguists that finish the translations. this family moved to northern guatemala, to pick up the project started by german translator, ted and gloria, in 1969. 43 years later, they finally have a new testament they can read for themselves. >> very joyful. very happy to have in our hands the new testament in bokonchi. >> reporter: the modern bible translation movement actually began here in guatemala. this is where an indian famously challenged a missionary who was selling spanish bibles. if you're god is so smart, he said, why can't he spe
technology has begun near tokyo. about 200 companies are taking part from japan, china and germany and several other countries. demand is growing in japan has power companies are now required to purchase renewable energy. but japanese solar makers lag behind overseas competitors in terms of profitability. this is one of the exhibitors. the japanese company is displaying solar panels with the world's highest level of power efficiency. it's trying to make a profit by selling solar panels as well as the electricity it generates. sharp is exhibiting a new product which is a combination of window glass and a solar battery. although it can be used on homes and office windows, it can generate only half the power of a regular solar panel. >>> more people in japan are planning to travel during the coming year end holidays. they're planning to travel for the first time in two years. this is due to the calendar that lets people take up to nine straight days. more than 30 million people have made reservations for either domestic or overseas trips from december 23 to november 3. reservations fo
and japan and germany and basically assure the renewable energy community there is a guaranteed off taker and price paid for electricity generated from a renewable energy project. it's normally 10 or 20 years and set higher than the going rate for gas or electricity generation so it provides a sole developer to say i have this contract for this off taker whether the caa or whoever toy bathe power and. >> >> and guaranteed to buy it from me and i can go to the bank i have this stream of income if you give me a loan. >> please continue. >> thanks, so one of the areas -- also that is applicable to efficiency is addressing barriers for 10 -- tenants and may be are tenants in their spaces and critical to reduce this for efficiency and new due to incentives or they don't have access to physical resources like their roof so expanding energy to renewable energy is one opportunity that would help the renewable energy space. right now all ratepayers pay into -- for example the state fund that goes towards the solar incentive but across the state only a quarter of houses can take advantage of on the
use that isn't sustainable so whether it's clean power sf or the ideas from germany and free berg i am proud to you part of that conversation and vote for it on the board level and one thing i regret not being part of the municipal bank conversation and i think that will be interesting and from a nerdy perspective. it's not exciting to most people -- or at least i hope it isn't. >> commissioner schmeltzer. >>i hope you come talk to us about it anyway. >> yeah. >> i do believe that for me that the vote on community choice aggregation was one of the most important votes that i cast as a member of the board of supervisors. i think in the scheme of thing what is is happening with the environmental needs of our city, country, world, that that's one of the most important votes and i think history will show that would not have happened without your involvement so i think it's very, very exciting and i'm very proud of you, and what is amazing about supervisor olague when it comes to these kinds of issues she's always gotten it. it's never been difficult. it was an easy sell, so thank you ve
investors. tens of thousands of them have made cypress their second home. in germany's federal intelligence service, a to says most of their accounts contain laundered money. the cypriot government denies that. now the country is hoping newly discovered gas reserves off the coast will help pay back credit from the eu in a relatively short time. the first contract with energy companies have been signed. while billions are being spent to bail out the banks, many indebted families feel they have been abandoned. >> seven months ago, we applied for social welfare relief. we have not had an answer yet. >> antonin solaris as a bit of money driving a taxi. he says the streets are becoming more and more empty. most people do not shop or go out anymore. he sees only occasional demonstrations against austerity measures. he says he wishes he could turn back the clock sometimes. >> i should not have taken out so many loans, and i should have been more careful with my money. i tell youngsters like my son to watch how they spend their money. they are going to have it tough. they have to learn that they ca
hollande did not get everything on his wish list. germany insisted that smaller banks, which make up a large part of its banking system, be overseen by national authorities, and it got its way. >> it is important to have a clear division between banking supervision and monetary policy. >> the supervisor will begin work in march, 2014, and be responsible for banks holding more than 30 billion euros in assets. the deal should ensure european taxpayers no longer have to foot the bill when financial institutions find themselves in trouble. >> i'm very satisfied. contrary to expectations, the 27 finance ministers have managed to save the european council. >> as for the question of who will succeed john graja and kurt as head of the eurozone, that is something members -- jean-claude junkecker as head of the eurozo, that is something members still have to decide. >> is this decision basically admitting that national governments are no longer able to keep their countries' banks in line? >> no. first of all, it is admitting that if you have a common currency, then you actually need to have co
for germany, which is a positive and will be a good gain forward. but say order box, very weak. demand, very weak. business confidence very weak and this is going to be hitting activity indicators going forward. >> even though the manufacturing side of it disappointed, the services was stronger. while services is a big part of the economy, it's where we're trying to see the rebalancing in the german economy happen. from that point of view, probably a rather encouraging development. >> it is interesting. it's also very exportwise. what we saw on these numbers was german exports falling sharply again. and this is just signaling that global economic conditions, soft patch very weak, particularly for the region -- i'm sorry, within the eurozone itself. >> and it's consistent with the weakening global demand we're seeing out of japan and other areas this morning. but it's not necessarily -- if you look at the details of what this is telling us across the globe, frankly a point to deceleration in activities. >> and maybe the global economy will continue to expand. they will signal that china is co
or to those nine. i got some shows in germany with him. i got to play "crossroads" with him. i have a lot of fun. the guys did not play with me. tavis: how do you know, circling back to the new project, "glad have been trying to be glad all over for several years. >> we were talking about it. it does not mean that you are simply happy. it -- you could be glad that it is over. tavis: i walked into that. >> i am begging on our relationship that you will figure that out. -- banking on our relationship that you'll figure it out. it was covered by the dave clark five. you have to go with stuff that is dirty and solid. i like that. tavis: is there any trepidation when you got back with "the wallflowers" that once you got past the racket phase and people would get it and get it together? >> there's a lot of different areas working. people respond to the group and what i do, i have no doubt they will respond to that. you will lose some people always. the ones that are faithful, i do not think they're turned off by any one record anyhow. you might have won favorite but i do not think -- i do not k
and southern europe. france and germany about going into recession. japan is already in recession. why apply the poison here. you don't put it on taxes on the economy and why put poison in the patient. i don't get it. >> i'm not for tax hikes or anything, but if you kick the can voters are never going to be ready to reform or pay for entitlement reform. don't do entitlement reform. it took two years for reagan to do entitlement reform. sell by date is long past due on these measures to fix fiscal problems. the problem is we're in economic era of falling expectations and that has to stop. >> if we kick the can for six months that gets us to midterm elections? >> yeah, but the flip side of the argument you can pass a lot of bad bills. nancy pelosi, let's pass the healthcare bill so we can see what is in it. the big thing that we need to concentrate on is getting back to 3% growth. this 2% growth, all of our fiscal problems are going to get worse. we only have a prayer of supplying more jobs, bringing down unemployment and braying down the deficit if we have 3% or greater. >> if we do it now, w
becoming a free port of entry like britain and germany. so we look back knowing the result of all of this which of course led to the emergence of the nation states with much greater powers reached is a precarious it was for a long period of time but it's also important to recognize the slave rights in terms of the civil war it was a broad state right settlement but the only state that seceded from the union were slave states and i don't think that is significant, too. there is no way of understanding secession and state rights outside of the question. >> prisoner steve, the nitze fusion proclamation committed to put an end to all the discussion and any existing remnants of slavery? >> it didn't. it was a very important moment because the united states, the lincoln administration exercising his power as commander-in-chief, it is a war measure, the abolished slavery without compensation to the owners, this is new. the northern states abolished slavery gradually because they were addressing the compensation. the property, having abolished property rights, you know, and without threat
, in germany, jewish and muslim groups expressed relief after the government passed a law this week explicitly protecting the practice of circumcision. earlier this year, a local german court had ruled that circumcision amounted to bodily harm. that decision did not ban circumcision but many feared it could open the door to criminal charges against those who performed it. jews and muslims argued that would have infringed on their religious freedom. on monday, united nations human rights day, protests were held in several countries in support of tibet. the number of tibetans who have set themselves on fire to protest chinese rule has grown dramatically. this week, a 17 year old girl died after committing self- immolation, one of eight people under the age of 18 to have done so. activists say the number of self - immolations over the past three years has risen to more than 90. close to 30 occurred last month alone. at the vatican ts week pop benedict the 16th officially joined the twitter sphere, with the launch of his new twitter account. the pope used his allotted 140 characters to send out
like britain and germany. we look back knowing the result of all of this, which, of course, led to the emergence, really, of a nation state for the first time, and one with much greater powers and reach than it had before, and you can forget how procariuos the union was for a long period of time, but i think it's also important to recognize, and this is about state rights and slavery in terms of the civil war. there was a broad state right sentiment, but the only states that seceded from the union was slave states, and i don't think that's insignificant too. there's no way of understanding secession and state rights outside the slavery question. >> host: professor hahn, 1863, the emancipation proke clay mages, -- proclamation, did it put an end to any discussion and any existing remanents of slavery? >> guest: it didn't. it was a very, very important moment because the united states, the lincoln administration, exercising his powers as commanders in chief, it's a war measure, abolishes slavery without compensation to owners. this is new. the northern states abolished slavery gra
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